Mapping an Arab Ecosystem (or two)

Panel Description

(via the MIT Center for Civic Media)

This session looks beyond platforms to explore the concept of media ecosystems. How do we understand, map, visualize, and ultimately shape the flow of texts across an increasingly diverse and complex media ecosystem? What are the relationships between professional and citizen, participatory and broadcast media? How do we understand what people are encountering, both in terms of supply (tools like Media Cloud that examine what’s published) and demand (tracking/logging efforts that look at individual or group consumption?

Slides

http://www.scribd.com/embeds/76380144/content?start_page=1&view_mode=slideshow&access_key=key-1dq3y6k6jefszy0xrwr1&secret_password=gnw26lpey4wpax51psl(function() { var scribd = document.createElement(“script”); scribd.type = “text/javascript”; scribd.async = true; scribd.src = “http://www.scribd.com/javascripts/embed_code/inject.js”; var s = document.getElementsByTagName(“script”)0; s.parentNode.insertBefore(scribd, s); })();

Coverage

The Revolutions Were Tweeted

Link

http://ijoc.org/ojs/index.php/ijoc/article/view/1246

Abstract

This article details the networked production and dissemination of news on Twitter during snapshots of the 2011 Tunisian and Egyptian Revolutions as seen through information flows—sets of near-duplicate tweets—across activists, bloggers, journalists, mainstream media outlets, and other engaged participants. We differentiate between these user types and analyze patterns of sourcing and routing information among them. We describe the symbiotic relationship between media outlets and individuals and the distinct roles particular user types appear to play. Using this analysis, we discuss how Twitter plays a key role in amplifying and spreading timely information across the globe.

Tweens’ Conceptions of Privacy Online

Slides

http://www.scribd.com/embeds/76381029/content?start_page=1&view_mode=slideshow&access_key=key-1zyn3ttgsosjxw5iopra&secret_password=8hfrnwaaolrnv68bbdw(function() { var scribd = document.createElement(“script”); scribd.type = “text/javascript”; scribd.async = true; scribd.src = “http://www.scribd.com/javascripts/embed_code/inject.js”; var s = document.getElementsByTagName(“script”)0; s.parentNode.insertBefore(scribd, s); })();

Moby Dick Project

Participated in the Knight Foundation-funded Moby Dick Project workshop on July 29, 2011 at Stanford’s d.school, where we used design thinking to develop ideas and interface mockups for re-inventing the way people consume news.

My group focused on the problem of background context for news stories. Our solution was an app or web interface for reading articles which incorporated a timeline of articles on the topic displayed as an interactive graph of news volume over time, and the ability to search for related articles by a keyword referring to either a related topic or an alternate perspective on the story. Below the graph, headlines of the most-read articles, fitting within the window of time the user is browsing and categorized by your selected keywords, are listed. Navigation history would be stored in scrollable panes so that users could browse laterally or dive deeply and the return to the original article. [A video of my presentation of our interface is below.]

Group Presentation Video

Interface Mockup

6

Original Call for Participation

Why Are We Still Consuming News Like It’s 1899?

Cultivating Ethical Thinking among Digital Youth

Workshop Description

This interactive workshop focuses on digital citizenship by focusing on the ethical dimensions of young people’s participation in new media environments, such as blogs, multiplayer games, and social networks like Facebook. Katie Davis and Erhardt Graeff, both researchers on the GoodPlay Project at Harvard’s Project Zero, will share relevant research findings; provide an overview of a digital ethics casebook developed for use in schools and other learning environments; and engage participants in a curricular activity aimed at cultivating ethical thinking among youth.

The GoodPlay Project

Research Assistant on a MacArthur Foundation-funded project studying the ethical character of tween’s activities in the new digital media, December 2009 – March 2012.

Website

The GoodPlay Project at Project Zero

Details of Work

  • Managed research study approval with local public school district administration
  • Administered pre-interview surveys to tweens in three different public school districts, two online and one on paper
  • Developed and implemented SurveyMonkey filter for selecting survey participants for interviews based on reported internet and cell phone use, balanced sample for gender and race/ethnicity
  • Coordinated interviews with 43 tweens at their schools, two per participant
  • Personally conducted interviews with 16 tweens, or 32 total interviews
  • Coded half the interviews for instances relevant to the online ethical faultlines of “participation”, “credibility”, and “authorship/ownership”
  • Wrote four coding memos dealing with aspects of cyberbullying
  • Developed original research paper on cyberbullying, using ethical dilemmas posed in the interviews

Related Publications and Presentations